August 2010
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Billie Silvey
Hawaii's
Animals
The parrotfish (above left)
creates Hawai's sandy beaches
by eating and digesting coral.  
The
grey reef shark and green
Moray eel can attack if
threatened, while the
whale shark
is the largest and most harmless
fish in Hawaii.
The humpback whale (left) is the largest
mammal of Hawaii.  Other sea mammals
include the endangered
Hawaiian monk seal
and
bottlenose dolphins (above).   Brushtail
rock wallabies (below left), natives of
Australia accidently released in 1916, inhabit
the Kalihi Valley. The endangered
Hawaiian
hoary bat, (below) perhaps the rarest
species, is indigenous to the islands.  It and
the monk seal are found nowhere else.
The nene (left), the Hawaii State Bird,
is a goose with white neck and
underside.  The
honey creeper (above)
is known for its bright colors, curved
bill and furtive movements.  The
palila
is another brightly-colored bird with
splashes of blue and yellow.  The
frigate bird's distinctive shape is easy to
distinguish overhead.
Birds
Mammals
Apapane (above left) bottlenose
dolphins (above); gecko (left),
Hawaii monk seal (below)
Rising from the floor in the middle of
the Pacific Ocean with the nearest
continent thousands of miles away, it's
not surprising that Hawaii has few
indigenous animals, more birds and
fish than anything else, and more
endangered species than any other
U.S. state.
Fish
Reptiles
Reptiles include the gecko
(top of page) and the
endangered
green sea turtle
(right)
History
Apology